Contact Lens Discomfort: Reasons of Contact Lens Discomfort | Bausch + Lomb

Contact Lens Discomfort

Soft contact lenses are generally comfortable from the beginning of use. Contact lens discomfort can occur but is usually easily remedied

What Causes Contact Lens Discomfort?

Contact lens discomfort can occur for a variety of reasons. In order for Contact Lenses to work the way they’re supposed to, it’s important to care for them properly, following the maintenance and replacement schedule. These guidelines help to keep your eyes healthy and comfortable in contact lenses. If they’re not followed, problems with vision, comfort and other safety issues can occur.

You should be aware that the following problems may occur:

  • Eyes stinging, burning, itching (irritation), or other eye pain
  • Comfort is less than when lens was first placed on eye
  • Abnormal feeling of something in the eye (foreign body, scratched area)
  • Excessive watering (tearing) of the eyes
  • Unusual eye secretions
  • Redness of the eyes
  • Reduced sharpness of vision (poor visual acuity)
  • Blurred vision, rainbows, or halos around objects
  • Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  • Dry eyes

If you notice any of the above symptoms:

Immediately remove your lenses.

If the discomfort or problem stops, then look closely at the lens. If the lens is damaged in any way, do not put the lens back on your eye. Place the lens in the storage case and contact your eye care professional. If the lens has dirt, an eyelash, or other foreign body on it, or the problem stops and the lens appears undamaged, you should thoroughly clean, rinse, and disinfect the lenses; then reinsert them. After reinsertion, if the problem continues, you should immediately remove the lenses and consult your eye care professional.

When any of the above problems occur, a serious condition such as infection, corneal ulcer, neovascularization, or iritis may be present. You should keep the lens off your eye and seek immediate professional identification of the problem and prompt treatment to avoid serious eye damage.

Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, cleaning your lenses with each use, and replacing them on the schedule your eye care professional recommended for you. This is the best way to ensure your lenses stay comfortable and your eyes stay healthy.

Poor Fit

Your eye’s size and shape are unique to you, and your contact lenses should be too. Your eye care professional performs a variety of measurements to make sure the fit of your contact lens is well-fitting, but sometimes, it may be a little off.

Symptoms: Feeling a foreign object in the eye, slight pain or irritation, redness, fluctuations in vision

Treatment: Tell your eye care professional – they will reexamine your eyes and lens selection to give you a better fit. This is important, as improperly fit lenses may cause surface abrasions to the cornea.

Contact Lens Associated Dry Eyes

People with dry eyes may not produce enough tears to keep eyes moist and lubricated. This creates discomfort when they wear contact lenses. Dry eyes may be inherent (associated with a number of medical conditions), or acquired (linked with risk factors such as smoking, computer use, caffeine, certain medications, and more).

Symptoms: Tired eyes, dry eyes, and discomfort

Treatments: Your eye care professional may recommend a lubricating/rewetting solution for your use. Moisturise your soft contact lenses to soothe your eyes and minimise lens dryness and discomfort while wearing them with a lubricating and rewetting drop. It’s important to find a drop that’s compatible with your contact lenses.

Environmental Allergens

Your eyes may become irritated when there are large amounts of environmental allergens such as dust or dander. These allergens can stick to the surface of lenses, causing irritation for the wearer.

Symptoms: Redness, irritation, dryness

Treatments: Frequent cleaning is crucial to remove any buildup that may occur on lenses. If problems persist, switching to a daily disposable modality can provide a fresh pair of lenses every day. If it’s seasonal allergies that are affecting your eyes, be sure to remove your contact lenses before using an eye drop that is specifically intended for use with contact lenses and wait 15-20 minutes before inserting your lenses

Underlying Conditions

Irritation in your eyes may not come from your contact lenses at all. If your eyes become red, swollen, or if you experience discharge, you should contact an eye care professional immediately. Your symptoms may be a result of infection, or underlying disease and should be diagnosed and treated as soon as possible. You should not wear contact lenses if you have an eye infection or while using certain topical eye medications.

Related Articles

Allergies

Allergies are your body’s natural response to certain medications or substances, usually resulting in itchiness, redness, and inflammation, among other sympt...

Know More

Watery Eyes

Watery eyes happen when eyes produce a surplus of tears, or in other words, when eyes make more tears than they can efficiently drain. This may be due to ove...

Know More

Infected Tear Duct

Inflamed tear ducts, or dacryocystitis, is an inflammation of the tear drainage system in one or both eyes that cause excessive tearing, and
sometimes re...

Know More

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, is an inflammation of the transparent membrane (or conjunctiva) that lines the eyelids and eye. It is a common condition that is usually mino...

Know More

Eyelid Inflammation

Eyelid inflammation, or blepharitis, is a common disorder in which the eyelids become red, inflamed, and accumulate build-up around their edges. Fortunately,...

Know More

Tired Eyes

Tired eye is another term for what is commonly known as eyestrain – when eyes feel achy, weak, or heavy due to intense use. It is not a disease, and does not...

Know More

Dry Eyes

Dry eye is the loss or reduction of the eye's ability to produce normal tears. It is one of the most frequent causes of visits to an eye care
professiona...

Know More

Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS)

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is strain on the eyes that happens when you use a computer or digital device for prolonged periods of time. Anyone who has spe...

Know More

Pink Eye (conjunctivitis)

Conjunctivitis, is an inflammation of the transparent membrane (or conjunctiva) that covers the front part of the eye and underside of the eyelids. Pink eye ...

Know More

Styes (or Sties)

A sty is a bacterial infection near the root of an eyelash. It is a very common infection that is rarely serious, although it is typically painful.
Styes...

Know More

Red Eyes

Your eyes may appear red or bloodshot from time to time. If your eyes are red and there is no pain or change in vision, it might not be a big deal, but
d...

Know More

Computer Vision Syndrome: A Problem of The Digital Age

Today we find ourselves living in a digitally-driven age, where all of us spend considerable time in front of any electronic devices with screens such as com...

Know More

5 Regular Habits Harming Your Eyes

Our eyes are sensitive, as well as one of the most complex and vital organs in your body. TWhen you take good care of your eyes, you can help lower the risk ...

Know More
Get Your Free Trial Today